Online dating critic com

Then along came online dating, which suggested a less mystical view of the matchmaking process.

Dating sites offer the lovelorn access to millions of singles just a few clicks away, plus proprietary algorithms to help narrow the field to a shortlist of candidates for the ideal mate.

The questions that many of these websites use are so mind-numbingly awful ("Are you happy with your life? And that's the point: this is not an extension of humanity and human interaction; it is a fundamental shift.

Interpersonal relationships are being transformed into products that can be (supposedly) objectively measured and objectively chosen, even though such relations represent the exact opposite.

This is further emphasised by the manner in which these processes are explained by proponents of online dating, as "opening up options" and "putting yourself out there".

One site, match.com, offers both efficiency ("Receive your compatible matches straight away") and informed choice ("Choose who you'd like to get in touch with").

Some of these developments are exciting and challenging, but in one particular sense the internet poses a fundamental challenge to the way humans interact.

The following criticism and concern regarding online dating is not at all intended as a criticism of good and heartening personal stories – I, too, know people who have met their significant other through online dating.

Today, internet dating has become more or less accepted as a way of forming relationships.

There has been some criticism, but it has usually been of the functional and operational kind, regarding subscription costs or users providing false pictures or information.

There has been little thought or comment on why matchmaking websites might be a bad thing per se.

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